Thinking Through the Past, Volume I, by John Hollitz

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Thinking Through the Past, Volume I, by John Hollitz

Thinking Through the Past, Volume I, by John Hollitz

Thinking Through the Past, Volume I, by John Hollitz

Ebook Thinking Through the Past, Volume I, by John Hollitz

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Thinking Through the Past, Volume I, by John Hollitz

This reader for the US history survey course gives students the opportunity to apply critical thinking skills to the examination of historical sources, providing pedagogy and background information to help students draw substantive conclusions. The careful organization and the context provided in each chapter makes the material accessible for students, and this helps instructors to engage their students in analysis and discussion.

  • Sales Rank: #76468 in Books
  • Published on: 2009-06-08
  • Original language: English
  • Number of items: 1
  • Dimensions: .53″ h x 6.41″ w x 9.12″ l, .99 pounds
  • Binding: Paperback
  • 352 pages

Review
Each chapter begins with Setting and Investigation sections and ends with Conclusion, Further Reading, and Notes. 1. THE TRUTH ABOUT TEXTBOOKS: INDIANS AND THE SETTLEMENT OF AMERICA. Sources: History of the American People (1927). The American Pageant (1966). A People & A Nation (2008). 2. THE PRIMARY MATERIALS OF HISTORY: CHILDHOOD IN PURITAN NEW ENGLAND. Sources: Elizabeth Eggington (1664). Henry Gibbs (1670). Letter of Samuel Mather (Age 12) to His Father (ca. 1638). Massachusetts Court Records. Lawrence Hammond, Diary Entry for April 23, 1688. Cotton Mather on Young Children (1690). An Arrow against Profane and Promiscuous Dancing (1690). Samuel Sewall on the Trials of His Fifteen-Year-Old Daughter (1696). The Well-Ordered Family (1719). The Duty of Children toward Their Parents (1727). A Puritan Primer warns Against Frivolous Behavior (?). The Roger Mowry House (ca. 1653). The Eleazer Arnold House (ca. 1864). 3. EVALUATING PRIMARY SOURCES: WAS PENNSYLVANIA “THE BEST POOR MAN’S COUNTRY”? Sources: An Historical and Geographical Account of Pennsylvania (1698). Plantations in Pennsylvania (1743). Journey to Pennsylvania (1756). Advertisement for a Runaway (1759). American Husbandry (1775). William Penn on House Construction in Pennsylvania (1684). Cabin, Berks County. Charles Norris’s Mansion, Chestnut Street. Early Settlements in Pennsylvania (1696). Wealth Distribution in Philadelphia, 1693-1774. Acquisition of Land by Former Indentured Servants, 1686-1720. 4. EVALUATING ONE HISTORIAN’S ARGUMENT: THE “HIDDEN SIDE” OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. Secondary Source: The Unknown Revolution (2005). Primary Sources: An Account of a Stamp Act Riot (1765). A Mob Punishes Merchants (1766). A Gentleman Comments on the Mob (1774). Mecklenburg County Resolves (1775). The Alternative Williamsburg (1775). “A Dialogue between Orator Puff and Peter Easy” (1776). Antislavery Petition of Massachusetts Free Blacks (1777). Blacks Protest Taxation (1780). Chief Thayendangea Pledges His Loyalty (1776). Correspondence between Abigail and John Adams (1776). “On the Equality of the Sexes” (1790). 5. MOTIVATION IN HISTORY: THE FOUNDING FATHERS AND THE CONSTITUTION. Secondary Source: Unruly Americans and the Origins of the Constitution (2007). Primary Sources: “Honesty is the Best Policy” (1786). George Washington Reacts to Shay’s Rebellion (1786). The Founding Fathers Debate the Establishment of Congress (1787). An Anti-Federalist Mocks the “Aristocratic” Party (1786). A Founder Defends the Constitution’s Restraints (1787). Federalist #10 (1788). Federalist #15 (1788). 6. IDEAS IN HISTORY: RACE IN JEFFERSON’S REPUBLIC. Secondary Source: Within the “Bowels” of the Republic. Primary Sources: Thomas Jefferson on the Indians and Blacks (1784). Thomas Jefferson on the Indians’ Future (1803). A Jeffersonian Treaty with the Delaware Indians (1804). Indian Land Cessions (1800-1812). A Denunciation of White Tyranny (1811). Thomas Jefferson on Black Colonization (1801). A Petition to the Virginia Legislature (1810). A Letter from a Man of Colour (1817). A Black Response to Colonization (1817). 7. THE PROBLEM OF HISTORICAL CAUSATION: THE SECOND GREAT AWAKENING. Secondary Source: The Second Great Awakening and the Transformation of American Christianity (1989). Primary Sources: “The Last Will and Testament of the Springfield Presbytery” (1804). “On Predestination” (1809). A Defense of Camp Meetings (1814). Book of Mormon (1830). A Methodist “Circuit-Rider” Discusses Education and the Ministry (1856). Negro Methodists Holding a Meeting in Philadelphia (ca. 1812). A Former Slave Discusses the Appeal of Methodism (1856). Frances Trollope’s Account of a Camp Meeting. Harriet Martineau on the Condition of American Women (1837). Rebeccah Lee on the Appeal of Christianity. Philadelphia Journeymen Protest Their Conditions. Occupations of Methodist Converts in Philadelphia. Alexis de Tocqueville on the Condition of Americans. 8. GRAND THEORY AND HISTORY: DEMOCRACY AND THE FRONTIER. Secondary Source: The Significance of the Frontier in American History Primary Sources: Sketch of Trappers (1837). N. J. Wyeth’s Instructions for Robert Evans at the Fort Hall Trading Post (1834). Scene of the San Gabriel Mission (1832). Autobiography (1833). On Settling in Missouri (1839). View of the Valley of the Mississippi (1832). Daguerreotype of The Stump Orator (1847). Brigham Young on Land Distribution (1848). Life in the Gold Fields (1849). A San Francisco Saloon (1855). An English-Chinese Phrase Book (1875). The Pioneer Cowpen (1849). We Went to Kansas (1862). 9. HISTORY AS BIOGRAPHY: HISTORIANS AND OLD HICKORY. Secondary Source: Andrew Jackson (2005). Primary Sources: Jackson on His Experiences During the Revolution (n.d.). Andrew Jackson to Charles Henry Dickinson (1806). Andrew Jackson to Rachel Jackson (1813). Andrew Jackson to William Blount (1812). Old Hickory (1819). Andrew Jackson (1820). Andrew Jackson to John Coffee (1832). Andrew Jackson to Joel Poinsett (1832). Andrew Jackson’s Nullification Proclamation (1832). 10. HISTORY “FROM THE BOTTOM UP”: HISTORIANS AND SLAVERY. Secondary Source: Community, Culture, and Conflict on an Antebellum Plantation (1980). Primary Sources: Leaves from a Slave’s Journal of Life (1842). Harry McMillan, Interviewed by the American Freedmen’s Inquiry Commission (1863). Charity Bowery (1847-1848). Uncle Ben (1910). Sarah Fitzpatrick (1938). A Slave’s Letter to His Former Master (1844). Lynchburg Negro Dance, an Artist’s View of Slavery (1853). A Slave Spiritual (ca. 1863). Brer Rabbit Outsmarts Brer Fox. A Slave Child’s Doll (ca. 1850). A Plantation Plan (ca. 1857). 11. IDEOLOGY AND SOCIETY: THE BOUNDS OF WOMANHOOD IN THE NORTH AND SOUTH. Secondary Sources: The Bonds of Womanhood (1997). Domestic Ideology in the South (1998). Primary Sources: Woman in America (1841). Treatise on Domestic Economy (1841). Lowell Offering (1845). The Evils of Factory Life (1845). The Times That Try Men’s Souls (1837). A’n’t I a Woman (1851). “Virtue, Love, & Temperance” (1851). The Ideal Southern Woman (1835). “Woman’s Progress” (1853). “Memoir on Slavery” (1853). Journal of Mary Moragne (1842). Mary Boykin Chesnut on Slavery and Sex (1861). 12. GRAND THEORY, GREAT BATTLES, AND HISTORICAL CAUSES: WHY SECESSION FAILED. Secondary Sources: Blue over Gray: Sources of Success and Failure in the Civil War (1875). Why the North Won (1988). Primary Sources: The Impending Crisis (1857). The Cotton Kingdom (1861). An Account of the Battle of Gettysburg (1863). General Ulysses S. Grant to Edwin M. Stanton (1865). Affidavit of a Tennessee Freedman (1865). Reverend Garrison Frazier on the Aspirations of His Fellow Blacks (1865). Southern Women Feeling the Effects of Rebellion and Creating Bread Riots (1863). Excerpt from Diary of Margaret Junkin Preston (1862). “Kate,” A Letter to a Friend (1862). Account of a Slaveholding Family During Sherman’s March (1864). 13. THE IMPORTANCE OF HISTORICAL INTERPRETATION: THE MEANING OF RECONSTRUCTION. Secondary Sources: Seeds of Failure in Radical Race Policy (1966). Forever Free (2006). Primary Sources: Colored Rule in a Reconstructed (?) State (1874). The Ignorant Vote-Honors Are Easy (1876). Black Response to a South Carolina White Taxpayers’ Convention Appeal to Congress (1874). Statement of Colored People’s Convention in Charleston, South Carolina (1865). A Republican Newspaper’s Description of a Local Political Meeting (1867). Testimony of Abram Colby (1872). Lewis McGee to the Governor of Mississippi (1875). Testimony of Emanuel Fortune (1872). Testimony of Henry M. Turner (1872).

About the Author
John Hollitz received his PhD from the University of Wisconsin in 1981 and has been professor of history at the Community College of Southern Nevada since 1992. Previously, he taught at California State University, Chico. In addition to CONTENDING VOICES, John has also authored a biographical reader, THINKING THROUGH THE PAST (2010). John is a dedicated teacher of the U.S. History survey course.

Most helpful customer reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful.
Wonderful Teaching Tool
By amerhistprof
This book has been invaluable in my introductory college courses on U.S. History. It is a great addition to the textbook, because it shows students multiple historical arguments and provides them the tools they need to write their own historical arguments. This book really helps students grasp that history is not just a collection of facts, but that historians interpret these facts, and that historians do not always agree on how best to interpret them. While some of these texts might be available elsewhere, Hollitz has done a great job of assembling a wide variety of primary sources that help students evaluate the secondary sources contained in the book. It also provides a great starting point for writing assignments. The structure of the book is highly scaffolded to help students absorb the historical process step by step–it begins with a comparison of textbook treatments of Native Americans at three different times in the twentieth century; the next chapter has students draw their own conclusions based on some of the most accessible Puritan sources I have ever seen. The third chapter presents students with a secondary source and a number of primary sources that support the author’s conclusions and that contradict them; some chapters present varying interpretations by multiple historians, along with primary sources so that students can evaluate which argument they agree with more. I have found this book enormously helpful in working with both adult and traditionally aged college students, in both the liberal arts classroom and in online environments. I would imagine it would also be very useful for high school teachers working to introduce their students to historical methods (especially with advanced students). I cannot recommend this book highly enough!

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful.
Easy Read
By Moraiwe
It’s a great read and it makes sense; I bought this for my history class. It is very well written and the photos are fantastic as well.

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful.
Easy Read
By rblessedtx
Needed for Hist 1301, would recommend to others who want a overview of U.S. History that is an easy read. I did learn more as expected, about U.S. history.

See all 18 customer reviews…

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