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Routing in the Internet (2nd Edition), by Christian Huitema

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Routing in the Internet (2nd Edition), by Christian Huitema

The Internet routing best-seller-now completely updated! Nobody knows more about Internet routing than Christian Huitema, former head of the Internet Architecture Board. Now, hes completely updated his classic best-seller on Internet routing to deliver the critical information that networking and software professionals need right now. Routing in the Internet, Second Edition offers unparalleled practical insight for architecting 21st century enterprise networks. Youll find all this, and more: * Internet Quality of Service (QoS) technologies, including policy routing and Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) * Extensively updated coverage of the OSPF (Open Shortest Path First) intra-company protocol * Revamped, in-depth coverage of BGPv4 for connecting enterprises to Internet Service Providers * IPv6: Rationale, goals, technical details, and key migration issues * Internet multicasting: how it works, and how you can use it today * Mobile IP: a preview of anywhere, anytime Internet connectivity PC Week called the first edition of Routing in the Internet surprisingly approachable; IEEE Communications called it excellent. Communications and networking professionals worldwide will cal

  • Sales Rank: #1940061 in Books
  • Published on: 1999-12-03
  • Original language: English
  • Number of items: 1
  • Dimensions: 9.00″ h x .90″ w x 6.90″ l, 1.41 pounds
  • Binding: Paperback
  • 385 pages

Amazon.com Review
Routing in the Internet takes a carefully measured, textbook-style approach to a very complex topic, and rewards the attentive reader with a deep knowledge of how packets traverse networks. Author Christian Huitema begins by explaining the mechanics of IP addressing and returns to that theme (as it applies to IPv4 and IPv6) throughout this book.

Once he’s laid his addressing groundwork, Huitema sets out to explain interior routing. He begins with the relatively simple (and relatively weak) Routing Information Protocol (RIP), using it as a vehicle for introducing routing terminology and concepts before explaining why RIP is not a good solution for most real-world internetworking problems and moving on to more robust routing algorithms. His coverage of Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) compares favorably to others’–he is careful to explain each aspect of OSPF (including link state databases) thoroughly. Exterior protocols are covered similarly well. Huitema isn’t stingy with coverage of special situations, such as those created by mobile IP and IP multicasting.

Huitema’s style tends to emphasize the theoretical aspects of the subjects he covers, and he writes with a somewhat academic tone. (You’ll appreciate his liberal notes if you want to follow up on particular details of his presentation.) He makes good use of packet and network diagrams. You’ll be pleased by the depth and detail of the material in Routing in the Internet and, despite its lack of practical material, will find it useful in real-life router configuration work and in studying for Cisco certification exams. –David Wall

Topics covered: Internet Protocol (IP) addressing (including versions 4 and 6), address resolution, routing metrics, distance vector protocols, and (especially) routing algorithms. Covered interior routing protocols include Routing Information Protocol (RIP, versions 1 and 2) and Open Shortest Path First (OSPF), while covered exterior routing protocols include Exterior Gateways Protocol (EGP) and Classless Inter-Domain Routing (CIDR). Futures, especially multicasting, receive attention as well.

From the Inside Flap
1 Introduction to Routing in the Internet

I first heard of the Internet in 1982. At that time, it was still centered around the Arpanet. Its access was reserved to a few research centers around the world. Our own research center, INRIA in France, could perhaps have joined its transatlantic extension, Satnet, but we never quite managed to convince the funding agencies of the usefulness of such a project. In fact, we were quite happy to acquire an indirect connection through the UNIX-based Usenet network a few years later. We had to wait until 1988 for a direct connection with the NSFnet, the interconnection network funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation. 1.1 The Worldwide Internet

The situation has changed a lot since that time. There were only a few hundred machines connected to the Internet by 1982: it was pretty much the playground for an elite group of computer scientists. That number had grown to 2.5 million connected computers on January 1, 1994, when the first edition of this book was being prepared. By the time of the second edition, in July 1999, there are about 60 million computer addresses registered in the domain name service. An estimated 20 million users had access to it, then. Nobody really knows how many users have access to the Internet now; estimates vary between 100 and 200 million. The initial core of experts has been joined by a variety of teachers and students, researchers and merchants, journalists and engineers. More than half of the connected computers in the United States already belonged to commercial companies in 1994, while academia only represents one-sixth of the network in 1999. The initial Internet was mostly a U.S.-only network, with a few appendices in a couple of friendly countries. By 1994, one could estimate that over half of the net was located in the United States, about one-third in Europe, with a growing presence in Asia and other continents. This figure has not changed much in 1999, as the North American networks have kept growing just as fast as the international networks. This rapid increase of the commercial and international participation is characteristic of the recent evolution and probably explains the amazing growth of the recent years: the net seems to double its size every year! 1.2 How Is It Organized?

The Internet is not “one network” in the common sense of the term: there is no such thing as one huge international company that would provide connections to users in various continents. Instead, the Internet is “a loose interconnection of networks,” belonging to many owners. One usually distinguishes three levels of networks: organizational, regional, and transit.

The companies and institutions attached to the Internet generally manage an internal network. Its complexity can vary widely with the size of the organization. A typical example may be the research unit of INRIA in Sophia-Antipolis, where I used to work. The local network consisted of six Ethernet segments connecting about 300 workstations scattered in six buildings. The segments were connected to each other by a fiber-optic FDDI backbone that was directly attached to our supercomputers and service machines. Connection between the ring and the segments was assured by several specialized routers, using the Internet protocols. Indeed, this network was more complex than those of several small companies which often consist of one single Ethernet or token ring network. But large universities often have thousands of machines to connect, and multinational companies may have to manage a worldwide mesh of links between their different sites.

Most organizations’ networks are connected to the Internet through a “regional” provider which manages a set of links covering a state, a region, or maybe a small country. These regional networks provide connectivity to their customers; they also render a number of related services, such as helping users to manage their networks or to get Internet addresses and providing mailboxes for isolated users. The regional nature of these providers is generally derived from these service relations: proximity helps. There is, however, no regional monopoly. Several companies may well compete in the same city or in the same region. There is also no restriction on the scope of the provider. Some companies that started in a limited geographic area are currently expanding their operations to other regions, maybe other countries. In fact, we are currently observing the burgeoning activity of a new industry. While the market grows, many new operators start their own activities. Some will succeed and become the giants of tomorrow. Some will remain small and concentrate on a particular corner of the market. Many others will probably be absorbed.

Being connected to other Internet users in the same city, even in the same state, is not quite sufficient. The purpose of the Internet is more ambitious: worldwide connectedness. This connectivity may be provided by a “transit” provider. The first network that clearly positioned itself as primarily a transit provider was the NSFnet. This successor of the Arpanet had a deliberate policy of allowing connection only through intermediate, regional providers. Another well-known transit system is the EBONE in Europe, which is operated in cooperation by several European regional networks. Such an interconnection is not adequate when the regional networks have grown so large that they already encompass many regions or many countries. In that case, bilateral or multilateral arrangements are preferred. The NSFnet has now been decommissioned, and the transit services are provided by a small number of very large international networks run by commercial organizations. 1.3 A Study of Routing

Many books have already been written on the Internet; yet another one would not be the most useful addition to the shelves of our libraries. This book, however, seeks to address one very specific topic: the organization of routing—the structure that glues together the worldwide Internet. It is divided into five parts. The first part includes three chapters: the general principles of the Internet architecture, the presentation of the Internet Protocol (IP) itself, and the presentation of IPv6, which has been designed as a replacement for IP. Each of the following chapters will present both the state of the art, based on the current version of IP (IPv4), and the provisions that are made for IPv6.

Three chapters cover the routing within organizations’ networks. chapter 5 is devoted to RIP, the old Internet routing protocol. It is also an introduction to routing protocols in general, detailing the easy-to-understand “distance vector” technology. Then in chapter 6 we present the more modern Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) protocol, an example of the “link state” technology. chapter 7 completes this second part by discussing the other routing protocols in use in the Internet.

The interconnection between organizations’ networks and providers requires another set of protocols, more concerned with the “management of connectivity” than with the dynamics of routing. Part 3 includes four chapters presenting the first “Exterior Gateway Protocol” (EGP), then the modern “Border Gateway Protocol” (BGP). chapter 10 is devoted to the recent development of “Inter-Domain Routing,” while chapter 11 presents the general requirements of “policy-based routing.”

The fourth part of the book is devoted to the recent advances in routing technology, with three chapters detailing the support of multicast transmission, mobile hosts, and real-time applications. This is a natural introduction to the last part of the book, which presents the transition to the new Internet Protocol. This transition will be necessary if we want to connect thousands of billions of hosts to the twenty-first century’s Internet!

From the Back Cover

2264G-2

The Internet routing best-seller-now completely updated!

Nobody knows more about Internet routing than Christian Huitema, former head of the Internet Architecture Board. Now, he’s completely updated his classic best-seller on Internet routing to deliver the critical information that networking and software professionals need right now. Routing in the Internet, Second Edition offers unparalleled practical insight for architecting 21st century enterprise networks. You’ll find all this, and more:

  • Internet Quality of Service (QoS) technologies, including policy routing and Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP)
  • Extensively updated coverage of the OSPF (Open Shortest Path First) intra-company protocol
  • Revamped, in-depth coverage of BGPv4 for connecting enterprises to Internet Service Providers
  • IPv6: Rationale, goals, technical details, and key migration issues
  • Internet multicasting: how it works, and how you can use it today
  • Mobile IP: a preview of anywhere, anytime Internet connectivity

PC Week called the first edition of Routing in the Internet “surprisingly approachable”; IEEE Communications called it “excellent.” Communications and networking professionals worldwide will call Routing in the Internet, Second Edition absolutely indispensable.

Most helpful customer reviews

0 of 0 people found the following review helpful.
Four Stars
By JJ
good!

29 of 29 people found the following review helpful.
Disappointing work from a master in the field…
By Thomas Ptacek
I bought this book with high hopes. Huitema’s first edition was exceptional, covering in detail protocols in use on the Internet at the time. What it lacked in theory, it made up for in practical applicability. When combined with Radia Perlman’s _Interconnections (1st Edition)_ and access to the IETF RFC database, readers had access to all the information they could ever need about Internet routing.
Then Perlman’s 2nd edition was released. What _Interconnections_ had lacked before in practical details is more than addressed in that amazing book. One might hope that Huitema’s 2nd edition would catch up to Perlman’s in theoretical detail, making both books equivalent references for the field of Internet routing.
Unfortunately, this is not the case. Huitema’s second book reads much like the first. The “2nd Edition” enhancements seem to center on coverage of “new technologies” such as label switching and quality of service. None of the background that _Routing on the Internet_ lacked in the first edition is made up for here, and I found some of the coverage of new technologies to be superficial or poorly presented.
Moreover, the presentation of the material is simply bad. The book is poorly edited, with grammatical errors throughout the text and fairly unclear writing. Worse, the diagramming style is extremely inconsistant. Throughout much of the book, the diagrams used appear to simply be typeset ASCII pictures!
There are also points in the book where it appears that dated, inappropriate text from the first book was literally pasted into the second book. For instance, at one point the author asserts that “not many companies are making money off of Internet routing devices” (paraphrase), and “a company called cisco” (which he continues to lowercase) is a vendor of the most popular routers. Since he laters makes mention of Ipsilon, I’m guessing he hasn’t just been asleep as Internet routing companies rampaged across the NASDAQ.
Huitema is at his best when giving his opinions about aspects of Internet technologies. His recommendations are usually spot-on, and the historical background he provides about protocol development rivals the similar, excellent content in Perlman’s _Interconnections_.
However, with _Interconnections 2_ on the shelves, I can’t see a good reason to shell out … for this book. Huitema covers some technologies that Perlman doesn’t, but Perlman covers essential technologies (such as switching and multicast forwarding) far better than _Routing on the Internet_.

16 of 17 people found the following review helpful.
Another look to Internet
By Ruslan Moskalenko
There is a general rule of 80/20. It means 80% of networking books cover 20% of the available networking technologies because they are most common. The average book about internet routing includes 10% of RIP and IGRP, 25% of OSPF, 20% of EIGRP, 20% of BGP and just few words about multicasting, IPv6, resourse reservation, Internet architecture, mobile hosts etc. Another common feature of such books that they give you static shot of current state.
Usually it’s more then enough for day to day operations and many people are completely satisfied. But some people want to learn a bit about other 20% and see piture in motion. This book is exactly for them. Probably it doesn’t help you much in Cisco router configuration, but you can learn internet history and future from the routing point of view. You can learn a way how routing protocols are developing, what are the current problems and what to expect in a recent future.
This book was included in the CCIE library set and many people were really disappointed because it isn’t focused on Cisco routing and switching. In opposite, the most part of this book covers everything that is usually not included in Cisco books. From CCIE or Cisco prospective this book is not really interesting, but it has another goal.
A few more words about this book. It was written by French guy, and he is not Cisco employee. His style is completly different from e.g. Cisco press books’. Cisco wants to show you how well and smoothly it has solved problems, and this book wants to show you what are the problems and drawbacks of current solutions. Cisco gives you answers and this book sometimes just states questions without answers. It’s more academic review then manual. Keep it in mind if you are going to buy it.
The final words. Sometimes the language is dull and too dry but if you want to know current state of the internet evolution this book gives you information which is hard to find in any other single book. This book is very good but it’s goal is different. It’s like the most part of passengers have questions about tickets and they ask ticket agency. But some of them might want to learn more about airplane itself. They can find very good book about airplanes. It’s also interesting book but it’s definitly different and optional reading for the traveler. The same about this one. It’s optional and not the highest priority book but it really gives you a lot of new information about internet routing.

See all 10 customer reviews…

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