Pornland: How Porn Has Hijacked Our Sexuality, by Gail Dines

Ebook Free Pornland: How Porn Has Hijacked Our Sexuality, by Gail Dines

Pornland: How Porn Has Hijacked Our Sexuality, by Gail Dines

Pornland: How Porn Has Hijacked Our Sexuality, by Gail Dines

Pornland: How Porn Has Hijacked Our Sexuality, by Gail Dines

Ebook Free Pornland: How Porn Has Hijacked Our Sexuality, by Gail Dines

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Pornland: How Porn Has Hijacked Our Sexuality, by Gail Dines

Astonishingly, the average age of first viewing porn is now 11.5 years for boys, and with the advent of the Internet, it’s no surprise that young people are consuming more porn than ever. And, as Gail Dines shows, today’s porn is strikingly different from yesterday’s Playboy. As porn culture has become absorbed into pop culture, a new wave of entrepreneurs are creating porn that is even more hard-core, violent, sexist, and racist. Proving that porn desensitizes and actually limits our sexual freedom, Dines argues its omnipresence is a public health concern we can no longer ignore.

  • Sales Rank: #129405 in Books
  • Published on: 2011-04-26
  • Released on: 2011-04-26
  • Original language: English
  • Number of items: 1
  • Dimensions: 8.99″ h x .67″ w x 5.97″ l, .78 pounds
  • Binding: Paperback
  • 240 pages

From Publishers Weekly
As pornography has become both more extreme and more commercial, antiporn activist Dines argues, it has dehumanized our sexual relationships. The radical objectification and often brutal denigration of women in porn, she holds, leaks into other aspects of our lives. Dines’s argument rests on a compelling, close reading of the imagery and narrative content of magazines, videos, and marketing materials; what is missing, however, is a similarly compelling body of research on how these images are used by viewers, aside from Dines’s own anecdotal evidence. The author’s appropriation of addiction terminology—viewers are called users, habitual viewing is an addiction, and pornography featuring teenagers is called Pseudo-Child Pornography or PCP—is distracting and suggests that rhetorical tricks are needed because solid argumentation is lacking. Likewise, Dines’s opponents are unlikely to be swayed by her speculation tying porn viewing to rape and child molestation, nor by the selective sources she draws on to support her point (convicted sex offenders). The book does raise important questions about the commoditization of sexual desires and the extent to which pornography has become part of our economy (with hotel chains and cable and satellite companies among the largest distributors). (July)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist
Dines takes on the scourge of pornography and its permeation of all facets of culture in this history and call to action: “We are in the midst of a massive social experiment, and nobody really knows how living in Pornland will shape our culture. What we do know is that we are surrounded by images that degrade and debase women and that for this the entire culture pays a price.” Generously referenced, Dines’ screed carefully builds her case that pornography’s pernicious influence is a factor in the rise in brutishness and sexual violence, focusing specifically on how heterosexual pornography negatively impacts women. She has no time for arguments that so-called softer genres might be acceptable, and she goes into detail in explaining her reasoning. Perhaps she imputes too much significance to current flavors in the never-ending commodification of porn, but her purpose is to offer a compelling explanation of an issue that often makes Americans uneasy. A good, provocative title, but it should be remembered that to adequately discuss porn, one must adequately describe it. –Mike Tribby

Review
“Pornland . . . will now be the starting point for serious discussions about how porn shapes and distorts social and sexual norms. Dines understands both the economics and cultural power of the pornography industry perhaps better than anyone ever has.”—Jackson Katz, author of The Macho Paradox: Why Some Men Hurt Women and How All Men Can Help

“[A] thoughtful analysis of pornography’s infiltration into the American economy, its detrimental effects on the sexual and emotional health of women and men, and its ability to perpetuate both sexism and racism.”—Veronica Arellano, Library Journal
 
“Dines brilliantly exposes porn’s economics, pervasiveness, and impact with scholarship as impeccable as her tone is reasonable. This book will change your life. Ignore it at your peril.”—Robin Morgan
 
“An eyes-wide-open look at the way the porn industry exploits and damages the gift of our sexuality to fuel itself.”—Wendy Maltz, coauthor of The Porn Trap: The Essential Guide to Overcoming Problems Caused by Pornography
 
“Bravo to Gail Dines! She exposes a huge problem of our time that few people are willing to confront. Dines follows the extensive money trail, uncovering the role of corporate duplicity and greed while showing how steadily pornography has infiltrated into everyday life from almost cradle to grave.”—Diane Levin, coauthor of So Sexy, So Soon

Most helpful customer reviews

42 of 46 people found the following review helpful.
An important, difficult book
By Amanda Sledz
I went searching for this book after reading an article in the New York Times about declining American sexuality. This article stated that over 50% of American women now claim to experience little to no pleasure from sex. From there I read an article revealing that 47% of Japanese women report no interest in sex, and plan to never marry or have children. Both of these articles stated that researchers had discovered two likely causes of this decline: increased reliance on technology, and increased porn use. The first one made sense to me; it’s hard to have a spicy evening if your lover takes an iPad to bed, and then rolls over to send a few final messages and Tweets into a phone before passing out. See two people on a date recently? If they can make it through dinner without a phone check, it’s cause for applause. The second one though? Increased viewing of sexual intimacy seemed like something that would cause *more* sexuality, not less. Still, the article stated that increasingly men reported preferring “hook-up culture” to relationships because it was closer to their relationship to porn: quick and to the point and with a new face. At the same time, that “quick and to the point” is exactly what straight women don’t want, and so they’d rather be alone.

This book illuminated these assertions. The author deftly outlines how male sexual understanding is shaped through observation of porn-style sex from an early age. This isn’t stealing dad’s nudie magazine or watching an old grainy Hustler tape; this is one image after the other, with the option to increase the violence or kink as tastes evolve over time. The porn industry itself supports this assertion through documentaries like “Hardcore” (a UK release) and “9 to 5 in the Porn Industry” which interviews heavy weight porn stars like Sasha Grey at the early stages of her career. At that early age, the stars have to be willing to do almost anything, and are violently degraded and physically hurt for hours — so much so that 90% don’t make a second film. Even those who have long careers lamented in these films how evolving tastes are forcing them to endure increasing levels of violence and humiliation if they want to prolong their careers.

And what do young male viewers learn from watching this? That if they want to up the ante in a sexual relationship, they up the violence. That female sexual response mirrors male response. That women are willing to do anything, and there’s no need to stop, even if she’s crying or asks you to. Similar to the articles listed above, the author reports that only 5% of women report enjoying sex on a “hook up” — not much motivation to pursue further. She also states that men are also left vulnerable, and insecure about sexual capabilities when using porn stars as a means of measurement.

Is her evidence perfect? No. She bases a lot of her research on informal surveys of college and high school students. It is unclear what kind of racial, class, and ethnic diversity was present in the survey sample. It was also unclear how many surveys were distributed over all. It would be compelling to include data about the porn habits of sex offenders and domestic abusers, as well as female viewers of porn (an area that really needed to be addressed more thoroughly). Segments of stories from stars like Jenna Jameson and Sasha Grey, both of whom radically changed the industry before ditching it, further underscores the potency of her assertions. If these women are presented and understood as objects, do their male porn counterparts suffer the same stigma? Is there any escaping the objectification? And if there isn’t, isn’t it plain to see that this type of media is damaging?

I can’t recommend doing away with any form of media, but we should know what we’re watching, and acknowledge the potential impact. And this seems to be what the author successfully encourages each reader to do.

95 of 123 people found the following review helpful.
Important, Gut Wrenching, Groundbreaking, Expose
By John D. Foubert
Gail Dines’ Pornland lives up to its billing as the culmination of the life’s work of one of the most reputable scholars of the effects of pornography on society. In it, Dines lays out an indictment of the pornography industry where only the pornography industry itself could vote “acquit.” She masterfully traces the history of pornography from the feud between Playboy, Penthouse, and Hustler through the modern day mainstream “body punishing sex” and brutal violence of online pornography. Based on her several decades of research on pornography and its purveyors, she lays bare an industry that has violated women in every way imaginable and is now running out of ideas on how many ways to penetrate their orifices. Her book reveals to everyday pornography users and to people who haven’t ever seen pornography just how much porn is effecting our society, how violent it has become, and how much we all need to work to rid our society of its effects. Pornland is a call to action to reclaim a critical part of ourselves — our sexuality. Whether the reader understands the cause of pornography to be sin, patriarchy, oppression, whether the reader sees porn as an expression of healthy sexuality, an addiction, or a harmless pastime, all should read Dines’ critical look at this omnipresent influence on our society.

72 of 96 people found the following review helpful.
Think porn culture isn’t a problem? You need to read this book!
By Autumn
I am fortunate enough to have had the chance read Gail Dines’ book, Pornland. Dines’ describes how the porn industry operates *today*, in the 21st Century. She does this first by describing the men who created the industry as now know it: Hugh Hefner, Bob Guccione, and Larry Flynt. These men were excellent capitalists, not lovers of freedom. Dines provides evidence from women who’ve worked for them, and uses the pornographer’s own words as well, to prove her points.

She then describes the hard-core pornography that has become mainstream today. The popular film series Girls Gone Wild depicts all women as being sexually available, Dines asserts, because women, specifically young, white women, are ready to undress and make-out with one another just for the thrill of knowing men are watching…or so one would think from watching Girls Gone Wild.

Dines also addresses how both women and men are negatively influenced by the mainstream porn industry in their everyday life. Many heterosexual women are confused by why men are so interested in having anal sex; the increased focus on anal sex in pornography might have something to do with this. Likewise, the vast majority of teenage and twenty-something women in the U.S. have taken up shaving their pubic hair. This comes directly from porn, where women are typically shown hairless (liking pubic hair on a women is considered a fetish and there is a special genre of porn for it). This change in the way women take care of themselves has resulted in nurses changing the way they do rape-crises kits; they can no longer collect samples of public hair, as they once did.

Anyone living in today’s society should pick up this book, as I really did not begin to touch on the arguments Dines makes. Everything she says comes from the view of a Marxist and leftist who is fed up with the left not taking the racist, misogynist, capitalist porn industry seriously, and indeed, coming up with every possible excuse of why not to do so.

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